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What is a Geode?

HOW TO OPEN A GEODE.

 
 
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Est. 1969Est. 1969

GEODE FORMATION

This geode formation theory is mine; based on my personal feelings and beliefs.  It is not presented as fact, but as another option to be considered, evaluated, and accepted or not.  That choice is yours.

This theory along with a myriad of others have not been confirmed or proven scientifically. 

The "geo" part of geode means earth or earthlike.  Just by simply seeing or holding one, that definition makes sense because of it's rough surface and round shape.  Some geodes are solid while others are hollow. Most people who have hunted geodes for some time can tell immediately if a geode is solid or has a hollow space inside by just tossing it up a few inches and catching it again; similar to bouncing it in your hand.  This will be good to know when it comes time to crack it open. 

I, also, hold to the " bubble theory ", but not as it relates to any type of lava or volcanic substances.  Bubbles were the result of water receeding through sediment, in this case, " mud ".  These bubbles would leave hollow pockets in the mud, (ie: limestone).  I would suspect a time of drying, as the water level dropped, allowing these hollow pockets to remain empty long enough for different minerals to seep into these holes, thus creating the different type of crystals found inside.  Small amounts of minerals entering the space create a more hollow geode, greater amounts of minerals could fill up the space causing the geode to be solid.  I also do not believe that it took millions of years to complete this process, but possibly just hundreds or less.  At the very most geodes could be up to 4500 years old. 

 

 Mineral growth and change can occur relatively quickly, as evidenced in an abandoned mine shaft.  When reopened after 30 years, the beams used to support the shaft were found to have begun to petrify. Please read this article revealing support of rapid petrification based on the July 2004 issue of Sedimentary Geology at www.icr.org/article/13/.